Latest Reader Comments

  • darren swarbrick on Ending of rebated fuel: Will the construction sector see “red” or “green”?I don't suppose the Companies that have and will continue to go to the wall will agree with the "green trumps red" discussion in a time of the worst cost of living increases in years, unprecedented costs to households for utilities and now losing their livelihoods for a government who are too greedy and selfish to force oil companies to be realistic with their price hikes. But hey, if your privileged and dont need to work or stress over where your next meal is coming from, then yeah, the colour of the diesel and the massive duties now levied on it are well worth it.
  • Robert Mcginlay 74 year old disabled pensioner on Terminating a construction contract – the end of your troubles or the start?What if I don’t have a contract with a builder that is refusing to give a breakdown of cost’s for the job can I just walk away , we feel he is being under handed and dishonest.
  • Gerald Asbroek on How can we address the cost of poor housing in England?This could be a perfect example of how we could address community heating and cooling for these groups to avoid individual heating systems being adopted
  • Louise on How can we address the cost of poor housing in England?Definitely more needs to be done with the quality of housing stock in the UK. We treat a lot of damp and mould in houses, although sometimes it can be a ventilation issue. Perhaps more needs to be done to educate people on how to prevent condensation etc in homes.
  • Laurence on Why the listed building planning permission process needs to be reformedThis is a weird article. The thing that is important in understanding why listed building consent differs from normal planning permission is that extreme caution has to be exercised when consenting to something (such as an orangery or conservatory) that could adversely affect the heritage interest in the building. The listed building consent system is put in place to ensure that the minimum of harm comes to this finite, non-renewable heritage resource. It's not there to make life easy for homeowners and developers. There are measures that can be taken to assist in navigating the process- for example enter into constructive dialogue with your friendly local conservation officer, take the advice of a built heritage consultant when developing proposals, and supply robust documentation with your listed building consent application. That way the decision making process is easier for the local authority. And by all means employ a builder and/or architect with practical knowledge of working with historic buildings- a good project team will see you through.
  • Andrew on Why the listed building planning permission process needs to be reformedIn my experience conservation officers or Historic advisors are not practically trained and have come from an Arts degree with no building experience. Pragmatic decisions are clouded by academic unrealistic thoughts which are usually not in the best interest of the listed building. I had a project that in one areas proposed to remove a 1970's chipboard partition in a grade II hall, and the officer required a method statement and historic impact statement! To people outside the profession it makes us look like a bunch of fools! Coupled to this the heritage officer had not visited the property and had taken their decisions from an eastate agents web site. Karen your experience and comments are welcome to start the debate on what has become rather a silly procedure. If procedures are made too complex or unreliable, then people tend to take short cuts and bypass the system. This could take a line of causing more damage to our heritage. We need a conservation system that is pragmatic and staffed by people who have practical knowledge or experience. Years ago the conservation officer was an ex bricklayer, joiner or tradesperson who understood how buildings were put together and how many...
  • Mr & Mrs Smith on Experts back calls for licensing to end ‘cowboy builders’We are at the moment having a problem with a so called builder called Nicky Philip Morgan. Of Nicky Morgan building and Maintenance trading in Llanelli. After the severe storms in February 2022 we had a ridge tile fly off our roof onto our car. Had to find someone quickly to put a new one back on and unluckily chose Mr Morgan. We supplied the ridge tile and I cut it to the correct size. He fitted it and made some excuse about he couldn’t butt it into the next tile. He said if we had any problems to give him a call. He left the job half finished with no mortar between the tiles. He now can’t be contacted to come back and do the job properly. What a waste of time and money he was.
  • David on Why the listed building planning permission process needs to be reformedMany of the points are highly relevant, not all petty as noted by Jim Broadley. However its pointless if it isn't part of a govt lobbying campaign, as putting in here is speaking to the converted..
  • Madeleine Bell on Barriers to retrofitting homes within the social housing sectorI have just read Gail Scholes's article in PBC Today. It is clear she does not have an understanding of housing particularly the lower end of the private rented sector. I suggest she may wish to read the Housing Act 2004 as the article made her look foolish. It's hard enough being a woman in property without doing that to yourself.
  • Jim Broadley on Why the listed building planning permission process needs to be reformedWhat a petty, naive and embittered view of the process. To suggest that listed buildings may fall into disrepair as a result of an application for a conservatory/sunroom being delayed is so full of self interest it is unbelievable. Yes Councils are under resourced, yes delays can be avoided but most listed buildings are unique which is why applications need to be considered on a case by case basis by professional and experienced conservation officers rather than applying a one size fits all approach. Otherwise there would be no need for architects and 'creative directors' and companies such as David Salisbury could supply off the shelf solutions for any listed building.....oh wait a minute!
  • Dina Smith on Demystifying the engineering of light gauge steelThere are many advantages of the light gauge steel construction. The first advantage is its higher strength and low weight. This two feactures make it an economical choice for commercial construction. The second advantage of light gauge steel include cost effectiveness, ease of construction, and increased lifespan. Aside from a longer building life, there are no drawbacks for using light gauge steel. Its high precision in planning and manufacturing results in a lower waste production, which is good for the environment. In addition, light gauge steel is more affordable than other materials.
  • Ann on How we can begin to build better diversity in construction in 2022?The first thing that needs to happen is that white men need to stop treating their “diversity” representing colleagues with outright contempt. I’m a woman working on the technical side of construction and I’ve been called names to my face by male colleagues, assaulted multiple times, threatened, talked down to, had access to my personal phone number abused (everything from allowing their WAGs to directly send me threatening messages when I’m not even in the same country, to sending me ominous messages well outside working hours, with demands that I respond immediately). And the second I try to file a complaint, they close ranks and protect each other... and none of that is even touching on the pay disparities. White men in this industry have scathing contempt for anyone who isn’t them… and it makes me sick to my stomach, having to work in such an absolutely abusive environment.
  • Bobby Morcinek on Anwyl Partnerships appoints new managing directorI work for anwyl in crewe they are not a good company at all I got a 50p raise on my wages last year taking it to a whopping £10 pH but the sales team got a 22% rise yeh great company I got a bonus of 100 pounds where as every one else got 500 or over by a mile and now my site agent is Messi g around with my overtime iys not a good company and just can't wait to leave
  • lee wingate on The heat is on for housebuilders to adopt modular constructionA good article. Modular is very good for certain applications, although may not be the most efficient for private developers, where they need to react to market demand. The reality is that Modular (although depends on the definition) is probably best for social housing / Govt backed schemes where the factory / large volume nature required for factory production can be taken advantage of. For many schemes at the moment, modular can work out more expensive and requires funding much earlier than traditional, but its complex and not black and white. There are still a number of things within the Modular industry that need to be worked out, its getting there though, which is good. Scalability will be the next natural issue to tackle if the modular industry can truly deliver, but for that it will need a critical massive to allow for investment. The Government and Industry though, must NOT forget that, just because people will be working in a factory it still requires massive investment in the trades and technical skills.
  • Patricia smith on Interserve wins £7.6m contract for special needs schoolI’ve had a view of the school as my son has learning issues n waiting for the autism review as he’s got the traits for autism Would love my son to go to this school just awaiting for the review N also to see which that he has go in I’ve pu a couple of crooks down n high point as first choice
  • Tyler Lawrence on RICS issues updated guidance on EWS1 certificationSo what happens if a build is over 6 storeys and requires EWS1 sign off/cert and insurers exclude EWS1’s, therefore not insured therefore the certification cannot be completed, no one gets paid until completed, no sale of the building etc, any advice?
  • Steve Carr on Battling mental health issues in the construction industryThank you for sharing this article. Sadly many people still believe suicide to be illegal, it's why many won't speak about it or reach out for help. Suicide was decriminalised in 1961, yet we're still using the language which insinuates it is. Using the word "commit" can add to a persons pain, especially those who are bereaved by a suicide loss. Suicide is an act, a verb, a doing work. A person suicides or ends their life by suicide.
  • Miles on Major planning decisions susceptible to corruption, says researchBritish government and the monacy have been corrupt ever since I can remember. I live in a village in Kent only 8 houses local council now wants to grab the land for redevelopment as they say, to do with the government guidelines joke. We have been given a demolition order for the next 2or 7 years yet the government put aside money to upgrade the property. This council is so corrupt it wants to sell it on to a developer for rich people Most are elderly or disabled and ju before Christmas this is what we get a letter of demolition. Someone should ask the question what happened to the millions of pounds they got from the sale of council property and didn't build any new housing corruption is rife I. UK and always will be, they say about other countries only difference is they don't hide it like this country does.
  • Stephen Reed on Built to charge: Mandatory EV chargers in all 2022 new buildsAs helpful as this is, an EV Charger that allows you to make use of the car battery as a store and then releasing this back to the house to use in peak times would be much more useful, and allow the V2G and V2H process to start building extra resilience into the grid.
  • Zef on HS2 contract to deliver tunnel segment factory in HartlepoolThis project is already £50bn over budget. The award of a contract to create 100 new jobs pales in comparison to the 1.1 million vacancies already unfulfilled in the UK. What guarantee is there that people will want to work, when we can't even fill the jobs necessary to our society? Petrol crisis? Food shortages? Unemployment at a 20 year high? Surely Boris has a plan... Holiday in Marbella of course! Long live our esteemed Prime Minister.