New report shows how HS2 impacts wildlife, environment and nature

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‘What’s the damage? Why HS2 will cost nature too much’, a new report, published by The Wildlife Trusts reveals the vast scale of the destruction and impact that HS2 will cause to nature

The report shows how HS2 will impact the environment, wildlife species, and landscape restoration projects. Drawing on data from 14 Wildlife Trusts affected by the current plans, other charities, and landowners along the route, the report shows that HS2 will divide and destroy huge swathes of irreplaceable natural habitat and important protected wildlife sites up the length of England.

This will cause permanent loss of nature, increased fragmentation of wild places, and the local extinction of endangered species.

The report shows HS2’s current proposals will risk of:

  • 5 Wildlife refuges of international importance, protected by UK law
  • 33 Sites of Special Scientific Interest which are protected by UK law
  • 693 Classified Local Wildlife Sites
  • 21 Designated Local Nature Reserves
  • 26 Large landscape-scale initiatives, including:
      • 4 Nature Improvement Areas awarded £1.7 million of public money
      • 22 Living Landscapes – partnership schemes to restore nature
  • 18 Wildlife Trust Nature Reserves – many are also designated wildlife sites
  • 108 Ancient woodlands, an irreplaceable habitat
  • Other irreplaceable habitats such as veteran trees, wood pasture, old meadows
  • Extensive further areas of wider natural habitat
  • Barn owls and endangered wildlife such white-clawed crayfish, willow tit and lizard orchid. Rarities like dingy skipper may become locally extinct.

The figures are grim, and the reality is worse

Nikki Williams, The Wildlife Trusts’ director of campaigns and policy, said: “The potential loss of so many really important wild places and the wildlife that depends on them has never been revealed before – nor has the damage that will be done to taxpayer-funded, nature recovery projects.

“HS2 will destroy precious carbon-capturing habitats if it’s allowed to continue in its current form – it will damage the very ecosystems that provide a natural solution to the climate emergency.

“The data also shows that HS2 Ltd’s proposed mitigation and compensation is inadequate and the small measures that they have suggested are inappropriate – amateurish suggestions of paltry measures in the wrong places.

“Nature and our climate are already in big trouble and we must not make a dire situation even worse – that’s why we are calling on the Prime Minister to stop and rethink the entire development.”

The Wildlife Trusts believe that if HS2 has to go ahead, a new approach is needed – one that, in keeping with current government commitments, takes a greener approach which leaves the natural world in a better condition than it was before.

A Greener Vision for HS2

Early on in the planning stages of HS2, The Wildlife Trusts developed A Greener Vision for HS2. This report provides large-scale thinking lacking from current HS2 Ltd plans and, if considered, could provide the net gain for wildlife that is so vital to allow our natural world to recover.

While HS2 Ltd has proposed a green corridor along the route, it is far from adequate and can only be seen as a start to delivering a necessarily more ambitious vision.

The Wildlife Trusts are deeply concerned at reports that HS2 has removed its intention to “minimise the combined effect of the project” on climate change and the environment from its policy.

The Wildlife Trusts’ report ‘What’s the damage? Why HS2 will cost nature too much’ can be downloaded here.

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